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Gum Disease Treatment

Non-Surgical Gum Treatments (Deep Cleaning, Root Scaling…)

When evaluating your oral health, our dentist seek to treat any areas in need of attention in the most efficient manner. We seek to avoid surgical measures to control cost and prevent invasive procedures when possible.

Non-surgical periodontal treatments include a professional dental cleaning along with scaling and root planing.

A professional dental cleaning allows your dentist to remove plaque and calculus that has built up above and below the gum line. A professional dental cleaning is generally performed during your general checkup. Scaling and root planing are additional non-surgical procedures for removing hardened plaque and calculis from the mouth. This second procedure targets deeper pockets affected by bacterial buildup.

Performed under local anesthesia, your dentist will clean affected areas above (scaling) and below the gum line(planing). and will smooth the root of any hardened bacteria In some cases, additional microbial therapy is required to effectively treat any contaminated areas. Both of these procedures target the bacteria that if left untreated, can produce acids that eat away at your teeth leading to tooth decay and gum disease.

Follow-Up

For two to three days after the treatment, you may have some soreness and be sensitive to hot and cold temperatures. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help. You may be asked to use an antiseptic mouth rinse or warm salt water after scaling and root planing. This is especially likely if your gums are very sore. However, you should continue brushing and flossing as usual. You can expect some minor bleeding in the first days after scaling and root planing. This usually stops within a week.

Risks

Treating periodontitis decreases gum inflammation. It also eliminates periodontal pockets, which can trap plaque. Therefore, if treatment is successful, the swelling will be gone and your gums will shrink or recede.

The extent of shrinkage depends on the initial depth of the pocket and the severity of periodontitis. The more severe the disease, the more your gums will recede after successful therapy. As a result, some part of the root is exposed. This makes the tooth look longer. It also will be more sensitive to heat and cold. To prevent root cavities, your dentist may prescribe a fluoride-containing gel. It's also important to control plaque.

Has your medical doctor told you that you need to take antibiotics before certain dental procedures? If so, tell your dentist or hygienist about this before you undergo scaling and root planing.

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